Thursday, August 3, 2017

Procter & Gamble’s Identity-Politics Pandering

Ads aimed at the ‘social justice’ crowd will do little to advance mutual understanding — or sell soap.

  by Michelle Malkin August 2, 2017 12:00 AM @michellemalkin

Once upon a time, brothers-in-law William Procter and James Gamble sold candles and soap. Their 19th-century family business grew into the largest consumer-goods conglomerate in the world — launching the most recognizable brands on our grocery shelves, including Tide, Pampers, Crest, Nyquil, and Old Spice.

Now, Procter & Gamble want to conquer a new market: identity-politics pandering.

Industry marketers aren’t satisfied with selling useful products people want and need. They’re hell-bent on transforming successful businesses into social-justice busybodies. P&G’s “My Black Is Beautiful” campaign released a new video last week called, “The Talk.” It “depicts the inevitable conversations many Black parents have with their children about racial bias to prepare, protect and encourage them” across the decades. The ad plays as a kinder, gentler version of Black Lives Matter propaganda, but the underlying themes are the same:........

P&G should stand for quality consumer goods, not empty Protest & Grumble that divides more than it unites.  If P&G isn’t willing to tackle the full complexity of race relations in 21st-century America, perhaps the company should stick to selling diapers instead of filling them...........Read more
 
 
 

 

No comments: