Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Tim Flannery – baseload is just a “coal” industry idea (Yes and darkness is a “renewable” idea, right?)

By Jo Nova

How is this for a scary thought?  Tim Flannery says renewables will run the economy:
“What we can now see is the emerging inevitability that renewables are going to be running the economy…”
And I say: Prepare for economic Armageddon. Picture an Australia where we all have jobs — jobs digging holes, mucking out the stables, and chopping those last few remaining trees down. We may lead the world installing Chinese-made solar panels, but they won’t help us make anything that anyone else wants to buy. Anton gives us some numbers no one seems to have mentioned to Tim. Like, it takes 1,000 new wind towers to kinda equal one coal plant.  To Read More…

Editor's Note:  For those who aren't aware of the terminology;  baseload stands for baseload demand, which is the minimum amount of power that a power company must make available to its customers and that number will vary according to the time of day.  Solar and wind couldn't meet a fracton of that number and never will without incredibly new and innovative technology.  Technology we don't need to produce energy we don't need in order to replace inexpensive readily available technology that will last for over 200 years because we are attempting to eliminate CO2, because they claim it causes global warming in spite of the fact that the amount of CO2 is increasing and the world is cooling.  CO2 is a naturally occuring gas that is necessary to all life on the planet and is a fixed number.  The amount of CO2 on the planet is fixed.  It may be trapped in various ways, or it may be released, but there is never too much or too little.  We may have more in one form or another, but the system is designed to store it and release it. So we are working hard and spending enormous amounts of money to eliminate that which is necessary for life.  That's really dumb. 


The red line is what we need.  The blue line is what wind produces.




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