Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Observations From the Back Row

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency must regroup from a stunning court setback to its effort to get the latest pollution-control technology installed on aging coal-fired power plants in the Midwest and the South, including several in Ohio and Michigan…….. The agency claimed that change would have prevented 34,000 premature deaths, 15,000 heart attacks, and 400,000 cases of asthma annually. That would have saved $280 billion a year in health costs for an $800 million annual investment in pollution control by industry, the EPA said.
My Take –34,000 premature deaths, 15,000 heart attacks, and 400,000 cases of asthma annually. That would have saved $280 billion.  I will repeat what Steve Milloy has been asking for some time; show me the bodies! 

Author Carl Brehmer

Out of curiosity I ran some numbers related to ethanol production, which turns food into fuel.  To produce one gallon of ethanol about 22 pounds of corn (1) needs to be sacrificed.  22 lbs of corn contains about 10,560 calories, (2) which is enough calories to feed one person for about four days. (3) Therefore the calories sacrificed to make 90 gallons of ethanol could sustain one person for an entire year.  Since the US currently produces 10.6 billion gallons (4) of ethanol yearly, enough corn is being sacrificed each year for ethanol production in the United States to feed 117 million people.  This is occurring at the same time that the United States Department of Agriculture is reporting that over 50,000,000 people living in the United States are in "food-insecure households" (5) because their families do not have sufficient funds to purchase adequate amounts of food.


General Motors Co sold a record number of Chevrolet Volt sedans in August – but that probably isn't a good thing for the automaker's bottom line.

 
By Jo Nova

Steve McIntyre audited Stephan Lewandowsky’s data to weed out the obvious fake responses. That people would “game” the test was predictable given the clumsy nature of the survey, the one-sided nature of the conspiracies investigated, the virulently anti-skeptic sites where it was hosted, and the comments on the threads where it was announced. Obviously the survey hoped to show skeptics were nutters, and when it was posted in front of those who-hate-skeptics, readers obliged.

Steve McIntyre weighs in with a lengthy post, several original graphs, and concludes:
“Lewandowsky, like Gleick, probably fancies himself a hero of the Cause. But ironically. Lewandowsky’s paper will stand only as a landmark of junk science – fake results from faked responses.


As Tom Curtis observed, Lewandowsky has no moral alternative but to withdraw his paper.”

When the number of responses to conspiracies are graphed against the share that is “skeptical” of man-made global warming McIntyre reveals an interesting pattern.  The “Oklahoma” point on the bottom right of the graph was the most popular conspiracy theory — but percentage-wise, “alarmists” were more likely to support this theory than so called “skeptics” were.

France's richest man said Monday he would sue a newspaper over its front-page headline -- "Get lost, you rich idiot!" -- which came in response to news he has applied for Belgian nationality.


(CNSNews.com) - Taxpayers in places as divergent as Florida and Montana, Nevada and New Hampshire, Arizona and Maine--as well as their children who will eventually need to pay the interest on the federal government's growing debt--may not think they have a stake in the Chicago teachers strike, but in fact the budgets of the Chicago Public Schools show that American taxpayers everywhere have literally billions at stake in what goes on in this one city's public school system.

Randy Johnson, senior vice president of labor, immigration and employee benefits at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, spoke about the cost of federal regulations on the U.S. economy on Sept. 10, 2012 at the business federation's headquarters in Washington, D.C.   Over the past three years, the bound edition of the Code of Federal Regulations has increased by 11,327 pages – a 7.4 percent increase from Jan. 1, 2009 to Dec. 31, 2011. In 2009, the increase in the number of pages was the most over the last decade – 3.4 percent or 5,359 pages.  Over the past decade, the federal government has issued almost 38,000 new final rules, according to the draft of the 2011 annual report to Congress on federal regulations by the Office of Management and Budget. That brought the total at the end of 2011 to 169,301 pages.


(CNSNews.com) The federal deficit topped $1 trillion in the first 11 months of fiscal year 2012, according to the Congressional Budget Office, reaching $1.17 trillion, exceeding CBO’s August projections. “CBO estimates that the Treasury Department will report a deficit of $1.17 trillion for the first 11 months of fiscal year 2012,” CBO said Monday. The $1.17 trillion figure was $70 billion less than at the same point in fiscal year 2011, CBO noted, driven mostly on higher federal revenues. “Through the end of August, revenues in fiscal year 2012 were about 6 percent higher and outlays…

NEW YORK (AP) — The federal government has added about 50 types of cancer to the list of Sept. 11 World Trade Center-related illnesses that will be covered by a program to pay for health coverage.  The National Institute for Occupational Safety announced the change Monday, the eve of the 11th anniversary of the terrorist attacks.  "The publication of this final rule marks an important step in the effort to provide needed treatment and care to 9/11 responders and survivors through the WTC Health Program," NIOSH director Dr. John Howard said in a statement.  The institute said last June that it favored expanding the existing $4.3 billion Sept. 11 health program to include people with 50 types of cancer. That move followed years of lobbying by construction workers, firefighters, police officers, office cleaners and others who fell ill in the decade after the terror attack, which destroyed the 110-story twin towers, spewing toxic dust.



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